Tag Archives: Ninth Circuit

It May Be Time to Start Thinking About Equitable Claims Again

A recent decision by the Eighth  Circuit Court of Appeals, Jones v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., No. 16-1714, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 8112 (8th Cir. May 8, 2017), provides another signal that those of us defending against benefit claims increasingly may have to contend with simultaneous equitable claims for breach of fiduciary duty. Though the law … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Denies Health Care Providers’ ERISA Claims

The Ninth Circuit affirmed two district court judgments dismissing ERISA actions brought by health care providers in DB Healthcare v. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, No. 14-16518, and Advanced Women’s Health Center v. Anthem Blue Cross Life & Health Insurance Co., No. 14-16612. The health care providers’ argument was two-fold:  (1) health care providers … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Holds That Violation of DOL Claim Regulations Can Result in a Loss of Deference

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently held that claim fiduciaries must strictly comply with ERISA claim regulations or lose the deferential standard of review, as we have discussed in previous posts: Second Circuit rejects “substantial compliance” rule, Insurer’s Failure to Establish “Special Circumstances” for Extension of Time to Decide LTD Appeal Warrants De Novo Review, and … Continue Reading

Court shifts burden of proof to plan

Estate of Barton v. ADT Security Svcs. Pension Plan, — F.3d. –, 2016 WL 1612755 (9th Cir. Apr. 21, 2016), involved a plaintiff who worked for about 20 years (with a couple of interruptions) for ADT and affiliated entities. His employers went through several mergers and acquisitions during the period, and some (but perhaps not … Continue Reading

On Tibble remand, court finds plaintiffs forfeited continuing-duty-to-monitor argument

Tibble v. Edison Int’l, — F.3d –, 2016 WL 1445220 (9th Cir. Apr. 13, 2016) (“Tibble II”), marks the Ninth Circuit’s second review of the case after its earlier decision was vacated by the Supreme Court. Tibble v. Edison Int’l, 135 S.Ct. 1823 (2015) (“Tibble I”). Tibble I concerns the commencement of the statute of … Continue Reading

Unpaid employer contributions cannot be plan assets; debt is dischargeable in bankruptcy

Bos v. Bd. of Trustees, 795 F.3d 1006 (9th Cir. 2015), involved the owner of a company that participated in a multi-employer pension plan. Because the owner had full control over the company finances, he was personally responsible for making the required contributions. Moreover, he signed a promissory note for some $360,000 in payments that … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit judge calls for en banc review to overturn Providence Health v. McDowell

In Oregon Teamster Employers Trust v. Hillsboro Garbage Disposal, Inc., 800 F.3d 1151 (9th Cir. 2015), the corporate defendant, Hillsboro Garbage entered into contracts with a union health plan that provided coverage for Hillsboro’s union and non-union employees. Beginning in 2003, the union received contributions for the two individual defendants, who purportedly worked for Hillsboro, … Continue Reading

Where Administrative Appeal Deadline Ends on Saturday, Monday Appeal Is Timely

In LeGras v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., 786 F.3d 1233 (9th Cir. 2015), plaintiff’s 180-day period to administratively appeal ended on a Saturday, and he mailed his appeal the following Monday. Aetna denied the appeal as untimely. Plaintiff sued, and the district court had dismissed the claim for failure to exhaust administrative remedies. The 9th … Continue Reading

Death Resulting From DVT Caused By Long Flights Not Covered Under AD&D Policy

Williams v. Natl. Union Fire Ins. Co. of Pitt., 2015 WL 4080909 (9th Cir. July 7, 2015) involved the death of “an acclaimed horticulturist” from pulmonary embolism triggered by deep vein thrombosis after flying approximately 28 hours over five days. Plaintiff was covered by an AD&D policy through his employer. The policy covered death as … Continue Reading

Beneficiary Designation Forms Are not Plan Documents; Change of Beneficiary By Phone Was Sufficient

In Becker v. Williams, — F.3d –, 2015 WL 348872 (9th Cir. Jan. 28, 2015), the plan participant called the plan administrator to change the beneficiary of his pension plans from his ex-wife to his son. His employer sent him beneficiary change forms, but he never completed them in the years before he died. After … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Replaces Gabriel Decision On Equitable Remedies; Modifies Interpretation of Amara

We previously reported on Gabriel v. Alaska Electrical Pension Fund, 755 F.3d 647 (9th Cir. 2014), which addressed limits on make-whole relief under 1132(a)(3), and affirmed judgment for the plan fiduciary. That decision was a divided one, with a partial dissent by Judge Berzon. In December, the panel withdrew its earlier decision, and replaced it … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Discusses Limits On Make-Whole Equitable Remedies for Breach of Fiduciary Duty

In Gabriel v. Alaska Electrical Pension Fund, 755 F.3d 647 (9th Cir. 2014), a venal claimant met a not-very competent plan administrator, and the result was a helpful discussion of limits on make-whole equitable claims. [Note, on December 16, 2014, the Ninth Circuit panel withdrew this opinion, and replaced it with a new one, at … Continue Reading

Effect of Requiring “Satisfactory” Proof Is A Popular Issue in the Circuits This Year

Every so often a bit of legal synchronicity seems to occur. Sometimes its personal, like when you have several cases with the same uncommon issue, or multiple cases in the same rarely visited court. In 2013, there appears to be a larger force at work that has caused three circuits to address the question whether … Continue Reading

Vesting of Employee Welfare Benefits – Who Knew It Was So Complicated?

One of the great things about writing this blog is learning something new. I sometimes fall into the trap of determining the law on a particular issue in the circuit in which I practice most (the Second), and assume that other circuits are the same. Sometimes, though, it turns out that one circuit is not … Continue Reading

Looking in on Surveillance

The Seventh Circuit has recently considered whether surveillance evidence can be relied upon in deciding ERISA-governed disability claims. Marantz v. Permanente Med. Group, Inc. Long Term Disability Plan, 2012 WL 2764792 (7th Cir. July 10, 2012), involved a de novo review of the claim determination. The claimant was a pulmonologist who developed back pain. After … Continue Reading

Autoerotic Asphyxiation and ERISA

The Second Circuit recently issued a decision on autoerotic asphyxiation (which I will call AEA because typing autoerotic asphyxiation really difficult). The decision doesn’t break any new ground, but it’s as good an excuse as any to write about this never-boring topic. For those of you that have led a highly sheltered life (or were … Continue Reading
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