Tag Archives: Eighth Circuit

It May Be Time to Start Thinking About Equitable Claims Again

A recent decision by the Eighth  Circuit Court of Appeals, Jones v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., No. 16-1714, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 8112 (8th Cir. May 8, 2017), provides another signal that those of us defending against benefit claims increasingly may have to contend with simultaneous equitable claims for breach of fiduciary duty. Though the law … Continue Reading

State Law Is Not A “Controlling Statute” Overriding Contractual Limitation

Heimeshoff v. Hartford Life & Acc. Ins. Co., 134 S. Ct. 529 (2013), held that a contractual limitation period in an ERISA plan is enforceable as written unless the period is unreasonably short, or a “controlling statute prevents the limitations provisions from taking effect.” In Heimeshoff, there was no dispute that the contractual limitation provision … Continue Reading

Eighth Circuit Enforces Choice of Law Clause; Discusses Test for Evaluating Reasonableness of Plan In-terpretation

In Brake v. Hutchinson Tech. Inc. Grp. Disability Income Ins. Plan, 774 F.3d 1193 (8th Cir. 2014), the court determined that, where a policy insuring a South Dakota resident was issued in Minnesota to a Minnesota employer, and provided that it was governed by Minnesota law, then a South Dakota regulation precluding discretionary clauses could … Continue Reading

Eighth Circuit Leaves Open Possibility That Procedural Irregularities Can Preclude Discretionary Review

In Johnson v. United of Omaha Life Ins. Co., 775 F.3d 983 (8th Cir. 2014), the court determined that the district court erroneously reviewed the administrator’s determination under the de novo standard, instead of the arbitrary and capricious standard. It ruled that it did not need to decide whether procedural irregularities still could result in … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Evaluates Split in Circuits, and Rules That Order Remanding Claim to Administrator Is Generally Not Appealable

In Mead v. Reliastar Life Ins. Co., — F.3d –,  2014 WL 4548868 (2d Cir. Sept. 16, 2014), the district court determined that Reliastar’s decision on plaintiff’s disability claim was arbitrary and capricious, and remanded the matter to Reliastar to calculate the benefits owed for plaintiff’s own-occupation disability, and to determine whether she was disabled … Continue Reading

Administrator is Entitled to Require Strict Compliance With Plan Procedures

In Hall v. Met. Life Ins. Co., 750 F/3d 995 (8th Cir. 2014), the plaintiff’s husband participated in a life insurance plan, in which he named his son as beneficiary. After he married plaintiff, he executed a change of beneficiary form, but it was not filed until after he died. Shortly before his death, he … Continue Reading

Evidence Outside of Administrative Record Is Admissible to Determine Standard of Review

In Waldoch v. Medtronic, Inc., 757 F.3d 822 (8th Cir. 2014), the plaintiff argued that the plan’s grant of discretionary authority was overridden by procedural irregularities in plan administration, compelling use of the de novo standard of review. To counter that argument, Medtronic submitted an affidavit with supplemental evidence demonstrating its claims handling process. The … Continue Reading

New York Times article: Breach of fiduciary duty to fail to monitor and reduce fees

It’s not often that an ERISA issue gets prominent play in the press, but a recent article by Gretchen Morgenson is an exception. A Lone Ranger of the 401(k)’s  began: The arithmetic could not be simpler. The more fees you pay in your 401(k) plan, the less cash you’ll have for retirement. Still, fees hidden … Continue Reading

Effect of Requiring “Satisfactory” Proof Is A Popular Issue in the Circuits This Year

Every so often a bit of legal synchronicity seems to occur. Sometimes its personal, like when you have several cases with the same uncommon issue, or multiple cases in the same rarely visited court. In 2013, there appears to be a larger force at work that has caused three circuits to address the question whether … Continue Reading

Vesting of Employee Welfare Benefits – Who Knew It Was So Complicated?

One of the great things about writing this blog is learning something new. I sometimes fall into the trap of determining the law on a particular issue in the circuit in which I practice most (the Second), and assume that other circuits are the same. Sometimes, though, it turns out that one circuit is not … Continue Reading

Participant’s Attorneys Are Not Responsible For Subrogation Unless They Specifically Agree

In Treas., Trustees of Drury Industries, Inc. Health Care Plan and Trust v. Goding, 692 F.3d 888 (8th Cir. 2012), Goding, a plan participant, received benefits under Drury’s health care plan after an accident; the Plan contained an express subrogation agreement. During the course of Goding’s litigation to collect damages for the accident, his attorneys … Continue Reading

Statute of Limitations Can Start Running Before Claim Accrues

ERISA claim practitioners generally have the concept of exhaustion of administrative remedies engrained in our thought process. They know well that claimants are required to exhaust their administrative remedies before they can sue over a benefit determination. Given the focus on this exhaustion requirement, it may surprise some to know that, in many circuits, the … Continue Reading

Looking in on Surveillance

The Seventh Circuit has recently considered whether surveillance evidence can be relied upon in deciding ERISA-governed disability claims. Marantz v. Permanente Med. Group, Inc. Long Term Disability Plan, 2012 WL 2764792 (7th Cir. July 10, 2012), involved a de novo review of the claim determination. The claimant was a pulmonologist who developed back pain. After … Continue Reading

Autoerotic Asphyxiation and ERISA

The Second Circuit recently issued a decision on autoerotic asphyxiation (which I will call AEA because typing autoerotic asphyxiation really difficult). The decision doesn’t break any new ground, but it’s as good an excuse as any to write about this never-boring topic. For those of you that have led a highly sheltered life (or were … Continue Reading
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