Tag Archives: Second Circuit

It May Be Time to Start Thinking About Equitable Claims Again

A recent decision by the Eighth  Circuit Court of Appeals, Jones v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., No. 16-1714, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 8112 (8th Cir. May 8, 2017), provides another signal that those of us defending against benefit claims increasingly may have to contend with simultaneous equitable claims for breach of fiduciary duty. Though the law … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Upholds Dismissal of ERISA Claims Against Plan Defendants for Alleged “Cross-Subsidization” Scheme

In Hannan v. Hartford Financial Services, Inc., (2d Cir., April 25, 2017), the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed dismissal of a potential ERISA class action against Family Dollar Stores, its employee benefits plan, and the plan’s group life insurance provider (Hartford), rejecting allegations by plan participants that the plan defendants had engaged in a … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Holds That Violation of DOL Claim Regulations Can Result in a Loss of Deference

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently held that claim fiduciaries must strictly comply with ERISA claim regulations or lose the deferential standard of review, as we have discussed in previous posts: Second Circuit rejects “substantial compliance” rule, Insurer’s Failure to Establish “Special Circumstances” for Extension of Time to Decide LTD Appeal Warrants De Novo Review, and … Continue Reading

District of Connecticut Rules that Violations of Claims Procedure Regulations Result in Loss of Discretion

Following the 2016 decision of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Halo v. Yale Health Plan, 819 F.3d 42 (2d Cir. 2016), in which the Second Circuit rejected the doctrine of “substantial compliance” with ERISA claim regulations in favor of a much stricter interpretation, courts within the Second Circuit have increasingly held insurers and … Continue Reading

Internal quality assurance discussion about $100,000 error in plan interpretation not evidence of conflict

Running an employee benefit claims operation is a complex undertaking, which requires continual training and oversight. A robust quality assurance organization can play an important part in the overall management mix. Curran v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., 13-cv-289, 2016 WL 3843085 (S.D.N.Y. July 11, 2016), gives a concrete example of a quality assurance review catching … Continue Reading

Second Circuit rejects “substantial compliance” rule

In Halo v. Yale Health Plan, 819 F.3d 42 (2d Cir. 2016), the Second Circuit made a significant change to the impact of ERISA claim regulations on subsequent litigation, rejecting the rule that it is sufficient for claim administrators to substantially comply with the regulations. Instead, the court held that, unless there is strict compliance … Continue Reading

When does ERISA govern a severance plan?

Typically, ERISA litigation starts with a concrete plan, whether it is a retirement plan or an insurance plan. It is much more unusual to have an ERISA dispute turn on whether there is a plan at all. It is still more unusual to have the employee arguing that ERISA governs, and the employer arguing that … Continue Reading

Evidence Supporting a Claim Can Be Insufficient, Even if Undisputed

Roganti v. Met. Life Ins. Co., 786 F.3d 201 (2d Cir. 2015), involved a dispute over the effect an arbitral award for improper employment practices had on pension benefits. The opinion is useful for generalizing into the pension context many of the rules underpinning the arbitrary and capricious standard of review as applied to benefit … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Affirms Reformation Judgment in Amara v. Cigna; Reformation Governed by Contract Rules, Not Trust Rules

In 2011, the Supreme Court issued a major ERISA decision, Cigna Corp. v. Amara, 131 S.Ct. 1866 (2011), holding that courts could not reform an ERISA plan as part of a claim for benefits under 29 U.S.C. 1132(a)(1)(B), but could do so as an equitable remedy under 29 U.S.C. 1132(a)(3). The case involved a situation … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Evaluates Split in Circuits, and Rules That Order Remanding Claim to Administrator Is Generally Not Appealable

In Mead v. Reliastar Life Ins. Co., — F.3d –,  2014 WL 4548868 (2d Cir. Sept. 16, 2014), the district court determined that Reliastar’s decision on plaintiff’s disability claim was arbitrary and capricious, and remanded the matter to Reliastar to calculate the benefits owed for plaintiff’s own-occupation disability, and to determine whether she was disabled … Continue Reading

Nice Second Circuit Decision Illustrating Appropriate Administrative Review

Ingravallo v. Hartford Life & Acc. Ins. Co., 2014 WL 1622798 (2d Cir. Apr. 24, 2014), doesn’t break any new legal ground, but it is nonetheless noteworthy for several reasons. It is rare that the Circuit reverses a District Court’s determination; here, it reversed and directed entry of judgment for Hartford. Second, it contains excellent … Continue Reading

Frommert v. Conkright: The Saga Continues, or “Strike Two for Xerox”

I imagine that, for a federal judge, getting reversed is not pleasant, even though it’s part of the job. Well, pity poor Judge Larimer of the Western District of New York, who has now been reversed three times in the same case – twice by the Second Circuit and once by the Supreme Court.… Continue Reading

Effect of Requiring “Satisfactory” Proof Is A Popular Issue in the Circuits This Year

Every so often a bit of legal synchronicity seems to occur. Sometimes its personal, like when you have several cases with the same uncommon issue, or multiple cases in the same rarely visited court. In 2013, there appears to be a larger force at work that has caused three circuits to address the question whether … Continue Reading

Heimeshoff v. Hartford – Supreme Court Briefing

In petitioning for certiorari, Heimeshoff asked the Supreme Court to consider three questions: 1.         When should a statute of limitations accrue for judicial review of an ERISA disability adverse benefit determination? 2.         What notice regarding time limits for judicial review of an adverse benefit determination should an ERISA plan or its fiduciary give the claimant … Continue Reading

Hartford v. Heimeshoff – ERISA Regulations and Equitable Tolling

At the District Court, Heimeshoff also argued that the limitation period in the plan should be equitably tolled because, she claimed the applicable ERISA regulation required Hartford to disclose the limitation period in its denial letter, and it failed to do so. Hartford argued that it was irrelevant whether the regulation required disclosure because Heimeshoff … Continue Reading

Heimeshoff v. Hartford – Motion to Dismiss

Hartford moved to dismiss the action because it was filed after the expiration of the policy’s contractual limitation period. The plain language of the Policy gave her until December 8, 2005 to submit proof of loss: she alleged that her disability began on June 6, 2005; the ninety-day Elimination Period would ordinarily end on September … Continue Reading

Heimeshoff v. Hartford – Facts and Chronology

Wal-Mart established an employee benefit plan to provide disability benefits to its employees, which it funded through a group disability policy issued by Hartford.  The policy contained a contractual limitation provision specifying the deadline for lawsuits: “Legal actions cannot be taken against the Hartford … after … 3 years after the time written proof of … Continue Reading

When Must a Claim Fiduciary Provide the Administrative Record? It May Be Later Than You Think

Any ERISA claim practitioner knows that a claimant is entitled to get a copy of the documents relevant to her claim on request and without charge. But when does the claimant’s right to this access become effective? More particularly, can the claim administrator defer production until after the claimant files an administrative appeal? A recent … Continue Reading

Court Provides Guidance on Assessing Disability Claims Based on Subjective Evidence

The tough disability claims are often the ones where it is difficult or impossible to prove the medical condition with objective evidence (something that can be observed or measured). This requires the plan fiduciary to decide whether the subjective evidence is adequate. A recent decision, which found the fiduciary got it wrong, provides helpful guidance … Continue Reading

“Injured While Intoxicated” Means What It Says

Life insurance plans, accidental death and dismemberment plans, and disability plans often exclude coverage for losses that occur while the participant is intoxicated, or where the loss is intentionally self-inflicted. Though these exclusions are often very clear, they are often the subject of contentious disputes over what, exactly, they mean, or were intended to mean, … Continue Reading

Fiduciary Duties and Investment Bubbles

It is well-established that and ERISA pension plan administrator has a fiduciary duty to invest plan assets prudently. This duty is called, unimaginatively, the “prudent-man rule” – or perhaps the gender-neutral “prudent-person rule.” This rule, which existed long before ERISA was enacted, is enshrined in the text of the statute, which requires fiduciaries to use … Continue Reading

Vesting of Employee Welfare Benefits – Who Knew It Was So Complicated?

One of the great things about writing this blog is learning something new. I sometimes fall into the trap of determining the law on a particular issue in the circuit in which I practice most (the Second), and assume that other circuits are the same. Sometimes, though, it turns out that one circuit is not … Continue Reading
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