Archives: Pension Benefits

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Department of Labor Secretary Acosta Announces Partial Implementation of the Fiduciary Rule

On May 22, 2017, Department of Labor (DOL) Secretary Alexander Acosta announced in an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal that the DOL will not issue another delay of the “fiduciary rule,” set to become generally effective on June 9, 2017. Secretary Acosta stated on Monday evening that “[w]e have carefully considered the record in … Continue Reading

DOL Issues Final Rule Delaying Fiduciary Rule until June 9, 2017

As ordered by President Trump in a presidential memorandum (the “Memorandum”) on February 3, 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) proposed a 60-day delay to the “fiduciary rule,” which revised the definition of “fiduciary” for retirement investment advice purposes. The rule was originally set to become effective on April 10, 2017; however, after receiving … Continue Reading

First Circuit rules that ERISA preemption of claim is an arbitrable issue

In Prime Healthcare Servs. – Landmark LLC v. United Nurses & Allied Prof’ls, Local 5067, 848 F.3d 41 (1st Cir. 2017), the First Circuit ruled that an arbitration agreement required the arbitrator to determine whether ERISA preempted the claims at issue. Plaintiff purchased a financially troubled hospital that had a pension plan, and a collective … Continue Reading

DOL Calls For Delay of the Fiduciary Rule

As ordered by President Trump in last month’s presidential memorandum (the “Memorandum”), the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) proposed a 60-day delay to its conflict of interest rule (commonly referred to as the “fiduciary rule”). The effective date of the fiduciary rule, which revised the definition of a “fiduciary” for retirement investment advice purposes, is currently … Continue Reading

“Bare violation” of ERISA without concrete injury does not confer standing

Lee v. Verizon Commc’ns, Inc., — F.3d –, 2016 WL 4926159 (5th Cir. Sept. 15, 2016), held that a defined benefit pension plan participant does not have Article III standing to challenge the plan’s alleged violation of ERISA, in the absence of “concrete injury” to himself. The case is a putative class action growing out … Continue Reading

Extra-ERISA contractual obligation regarding pension plan is enforceable

Hunter v. Berkshire Hathaway, Inc., 829 F.3d 357, 358 (5th Cir. 2016), involved the interpretation of parties’ rights and obligations regarding a pension plan following a corporate acquisition. Its discussion of the extent to which an employer can obligate itself not to change a plan, even when benefits are not vested, is noteworthy.… Continue Reading

Mutual fund redemptions payable to participants are not plan assets, and broker can retain interest earned while holding the cash

In re Fid. ERISA Float Litig., 829 F.3d 55 (1st Cir. 2016), held that Fidelity did not breach fiduciary duties to the plans at issue by allegedly earning interest on cash on its way to participants after a redemption had been made. The case involved a number of 401(k) plans that had hired Fidelity as … Continue Reading

Court shifts burden of proof to plan

Estate of Barton v. ADT Security Svcs. Pension Plan, — F.3d. –, 2016 WL 1612755 (9th Cir. Apr. 21, 2016), involved a plaintiff who worked for about 20 years (with a couple of interruptions) for ADT and affiliated entities. His employers went through several mergers and acquisitions during the period, and some (but perhaps not … Continue Reading

ERISA governs plans established by church-related organizations

It is well-established that ERISA contains what is commonly referred to as a “church-plan exemption” which provides that plans established by churches are not required to abide by ERISA’s many rules and regulations. For many years, a number of courts have held that this exemption also applied to plans that were established by organizations that … Continue Reading

Evidence Supporting a Claim Can Be Insufficient, Even if Undisputed

Roganti v. Met. Life Ins. Co., 786 F.3d 201 (2d Cir. 2015), involved a dispute over the effect an arbitral award for improper employment practices had on pension benefits. The opinion is useful for generalizing into the pension context many of the rules underpinning the arbitrary and capricious standard of review as applied to benefit … Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit Rules Plan Terms are “Irrelevant” When Considering Equitable Claim

The Sixth Circuit is fast making itself the center of case law on equitable remedies under ERISA. In Pearce v. Chrysler Group LLC Pension Plan, 2015 WL 3797385 (6th Cir. June 18, 2015), the court held that a material conflict between an SPD and the plan permits a claim for equitable relief, apparently without any … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Replaces Gabriel Decision On Equitable Remedies; Modifies Interpretation of Amara

We previously reported on Gabriel v. Alaska Electrical Pension Fund, 755 F.3d 647 (9th Cir. 2014), which addressed limits on make-whole relief under 1132(a)(3), and affirmed judgment for the plan fiduciary. That decision was a divided one, with a partial dissent by Judge Berzon. In December, the panel withdrew its earlier decision, and replaced it … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Affirms Reformation Judgment in Amara v. Cigna; Reformation Governed by Contract Rules, Not Trust Rules

In 2011, the Supreme Court issued a major ERISA decision, Cigna Corp. v. Amara, 131 S.Ct. 1866 (2011), holding that courts could not reform an ERISA plan as part of a claim for benefits under 29 U.S.C. 1132(a)(1)(B), but could do so as an equitable remedy under 29 U.S.C. 1132(a)(3). The case involved a situation … Continue Reading

Court Requires Nexus Between Alleged Fiduciary Duty and Alleged Damage

In Santomenno ex rel. John Hancock Trust v. John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A), — F.3d –, 2014 WL 4783665 (3d Cir. Sept. 26, 2014), the plaintiffs, who were participants in employer-sponsored 401(k) benefit plans, claimed that John Hancock, an administrator that provided investment services to plans, breached its fiduciary duty by allegedly charging the … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Discusses Limits On Make-Whole Equitable Remedies for Breach of Fiduciary Duty

In Gabriel v. Alaska Electrical Pension Fund, 755 F.3d 647 (9th Cir. 2014), a venal claimant met a not-very competent plan administrator, and the result was a helpful discussion of limits on make-whole equitable claims. [Note, on December 16, 2014, the Ninth Circuit panel withdrew this opinion, and replaced it with a new one, at … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Emphasizes that ERISA Plans Are Not Always Pre-Eminent

In a recent decision involving fiduciary duties in Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs), the Supreme Court emphasized an important limit on the pre-eminence of the plan document. Recent Supreme Court decisions, primarily in the welfare benefit plan context, have emphasized the primary importance of the plan document in establishing a fiduciary’s obligations and a participant’s … Continue Reading

New York Times article: Breach of fiduciary duty to fail to monitor and reduce fees

It’s not often that an ERISA issue gets prominent play in the press, but a recent article by Gretchen Morgenson is an exception. A Lone Ranger of the 401(k)’s  began: The arithmetic could not be simpler. The more fees you pay in your 401(k) plan, the less cash you’ll have for retirement. Still, fees hidden … Continue Reading

Frommert v. Conkright: The Saga Continues, or “Strike Two for Xerox”

I imagine that, for a federal judge, getting reversed is not pleasant, even though it’s part of the job. Well, pity poor Judge Larimer of the Western District of New York, who has now been reversed three times in the same case – twice by the Second Circuit and once by the Supreme Court.… Continue Reading

Presumption that Plan Administrator Acted Prudently Does Not Apply in Stock-Drop Case

ERISA requires fiduciaries to follow a prudent person standard regarding investment decisions. For plans requiring investment in the employer’s stock, often called Employee Stock Ownership Plans, or ESOPs, courts have developed a presumption that the investment in employer stock is prudent. A recent 9th Circuit case has addressed the limits of that presumption. Harris v. … Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit Explains Why SPD is Still Important After Amara

In 2011, the Supreme Court clearly held that a summary plan description cannot trump the terms of an ERISA plan, overturning the rule in many circuits. Instead, the Amara rule provides that the plan itself governs over a summary of the plan when the two conflict. This does not mean that an SPD is meaningless. … Continue Reading

Revenue Sharing in 401(k) Plans is OK, According to the Seventh Circuit

Revenue sharing is an arrangement under which a mutual fund in which pension assets are invested pays a portion of its fees to the entity that services the pension plan. In Leimkuehler v. American United Life Ins. Co., 713 F.3d 905 (7th Cir. 2013), the Seventh Circuit held that the arrangement did not violate ERISA … Continue Reading

Fiduciary Duties and Investment Bubbles

It is well-established that and ERISA pension plan administrator has a fiduciary duty to invest plan assets prudently. This duty is called, unimaginatively, the “prudent-man rule” – or perhaps the gender-neutral “prudent-person rule.” This rule, which existed long before ERISA was enacted, is enshrined in the text of the statute, which requires fiduciaries to use … Continue Reading
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