Archives: Disability

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Department of Labor Proposes to Delay Implementation of Disability Claim Regulations

On October 6, 2017, the Department of Labor signed a proposed Rule “to delay for ninety (90) days – through April 1, 2018 – the applicability of the Final Rule amending the claims procedure requirements applicable to ERISA-covered employee benefit plans that provide disability benefits.” Specifically, the DOL proposes: Section 2560.503-1 is amended by removing … Continue Reading

Disability Plan Administrator Can Reasonably Change its Mind About Sufficiency of Evidence

In Geiger v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., 845 F.3d 357 (7th Cir. 2017), Aetna initially determined that plaintiff qualified for disability benefits due to bilateral avascular necrosis in her ankles, which prevented walking and driving. When the definition of disability was about to change, Aetna conducted an Independent Medical Exam, which found her capable of … Continue Reading

ERISA Preempts Negligence Claim Against Disability Peer Reviewer

In Milby v. MCMC LLC, 844 F.3d 605 (6th Cir. 2016), the plaintiff had her claim for disability benefits terminated following a peer review by a doctor engaged through MCMC. The plaintiff lived in Kentucky, and the peer reviewer was not licensed there. Accordingly, the plaintiff sued MCMC for negligence per se for practicing medicine … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Holds That Violation of DOL Claim Regulations Can Result in a Loss of Deference

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently held that claim fiduciaries must strictly comply with ERISA claim regulations or lose the deferential standard of review, as we have discussed in previous posts: Second Circuit rejects “substantial compliance” rule, Insurer’s Failure to Establish “Special Circumstances” for Extension of Time to Decide LTD Appeal Warrants De Novo Review, and … Continue Reading

District of Connecticut Rules that Violations of Claims Procedure Regulations Result in Loss of Discretion

Following the 2016 decision of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Halo v. Yale Health Plan, 819 F.3d 42 (2d Cir. 2016), in which the Second Circuit rejected the doctrine of “substantial compliance” with ERISA claim regulations in favor of a much stricter interpretation, courts within the Second Circuit have increasingly held insurers and … Continue Reading

Insurer’s Failure to Establish “Special Circumstances” for Extension of Time to Decide LTD Appeal Warrants De Novo Review

In a recent decision from the Southern District of New York in a case concerning a dispute over the denial of long-term disability (LTD) benefits, a District Court judge held that the LTD insurer had failed to establish special circumstances warranting an extension of the time frame for deciding the claimant’s appeal during the administrative … Continue Reading

Does Presidential Memorandum Affect Disability Claim Regulations?

The DOL’s recent amendments to the disability claim regulations, 29 C.F.R. §  2560.503-1, became effective January 18, 2017, but the new provisions in that new regulation do not take effect until January 1, 2018 (for claims filed after that date). The January 18, 2017 effective date was apparently intentional, as it was just before inauguration … Continue Reading

DOL Issues New Regulations for Plans Providing Disability Benefits

On December 19, 2016, the Department of Labor ended a year-long process to update the regulations governing claim procedures for disability plans, 29 C.F.R. §  2560.503-1. The text of the new regulations, and the DOL’s explanation of changes and the comment process, can be found here. The DOL’s express goal in establishing these new regulations … Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit criticizes administrator for not allowing treating doctors more time to return calls

Shaw v. AT&T Umbrella Ben. Plan No. 1, 795 F.3d 538 (6th Cir. 2015) concerned denial of plaintiff’s claim for disability due to chronic neck pain. The district court affirmed the denial, but the 6th Circuit reversed, finding the determination arbitrary and capricious. The court took issue with much of the claim administration, criticizing the … Continue Reading

First Circuit Applies Younger abstention doctrine to ERISA preemption claim

In Sirva Relocation, LLC v. Richie, 794 F.3d 185 (1st Cir. 2015), ERISA preemption met federal abstention, and lost. Knight was an employee of Sirva, which had a disability plan insured by Aetna. Knight received 24 months of disability benefits, which were then terminated under a mental illness limitation; he responded by filing a discrimination … Continue Reading

Sixth Circuit At it Again: Orders Make-Whole Relief in Disability Benefit Claim

In Stiso v. Intl. Steel Group, 2015 WL 3555917 (6th Cir. June 9, 2015), the court reversed a ruling by the district court that dismissed a claim for make-whole relief, and directed the district court “to grant an equitable remedy [against the employer and insurer] equivalent to the promised increase in benefits to plaintiff.” The … Continue Reading

ERISA Claim Accrues Upon Clear Repudiation of Claim, Even if There is No Formal Denial Letter

In Witt v. Metro. Life Ins. Co., 772 F.3d 1269 (11th Cir. 2014), the court answered the question: “what happens when the defendant says it issued a formal denial letter and the plaintiff says he never received the letter, but it is undisputed the defendant terminated benefits and did not pay the plaintiff any benefits … Continue Reading

Eighth Circuit Enforces Choice of Law Clause; Discusses Test for Evaluating Reasonableness of Plan In-terpretation

In Brake v. Hutchinson Tech. Inc. Grp. Disability Income Ins. Plan, 774 F.3d 1193 (8th Cir. 2014), the court determined that, where a policy insuring a South Dakota resident was issued in Minnesota to a Minnesota employer, and provided that it was governed by Minnesota law, then a South Dakota regulation precluding discretionary clauses could … Continue Reading

Eighth Circuit Leaves Open Possibility That Procedural Irregularities Can Preclude Discretionary Review

In Johnson v. United of Omaha Life Ins. Co., 775 F.3d 983 (8th Cir. 2014), the court determined that the district court erroneously reviewed the administrator’s determination under the de novo standard, instead of the arbitrary and capricious standard. It ruled that it did not need to decide whether procedural irregularities still could result in … Continue Reading

Court Provides Narrow Interpretation for Mental Illness Limitation

In George v. Reliance Standard Life Ins. Co., 776 F.3d 349 (5th Cir. 2015), a case of first impression, a divided Fifth Circuit panel decided when a disability is “caused by or contributed to by” a mental illness. The plaintiff was a helicopter pilot who was disabled due to pain suffered at the site of … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Evaluates Split in Circuits, and Rules That Order Remanding Claim to Administrator Is Generally Not Appealable

In Mead v. Reliastar Life Ins. Co., — F.3d –,  2014 WL 4548868 (2d Cir. Sept. 16, 2014), the district court determined that Reliastar’s decision on plaintiff’s disability claim was arbitrary and capricious, and remanded the matter to Reliastar to calculate the benefits owed for plaintiff’s own-occupation disability, and to determine whether she was disabled … Continue Reading

Nice Second Circuit Decision Illustrating Appropriate Administrative Review

Ingravallo v. Hartford Life & Acc. Ins. Co., 2014 WL 1622798 (2d Cir. Apr. 24, 2014), doesn’t break any new legal ground, but it is nonetheless noteworthy for several reasons. It is rare that the Circuit reverses a District Court’s determination; here, it reversed and directed entry of judgment for Hartford. Second, it contains excellent … Continue Reading

Must disability claim administrators now obtain the SSDI file in the 11th Circuit?

A divided panel on the Eleventh Circuit has imposed on plan administrators “an obligation to consider the evidence presented to the SSA” by the claimant. While it is not particularly novel to hold that an SSDI award must be considered – most circuits require disability claim administrators to consider an SSDI award, or at least … Continue Reading
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