Archives: Fiduciary Duties

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Court Requires Nexus Between Alleged Fiduciary Duty and Alleged Damage

In Santomenno ex rel. John Hancock Trust v. John Hancock Life Ins. Co. (U.S.A), — F.3d –, 2014 WL 4783665 (3d Cir. Sept. 26, 2014), the plaintiffs, who were participants in employer-sponsored 401(k) benefit plans, claimed that John Hancock, an administrator that provided investment services to plans, breached its fiduciary duty by allegedly charging the … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit Discusses Limits On Make-Whole Equitable Remedies for Breach of Fiduciary Duty

In Gabriel v. Alaska Electrical Pension Fund, 755 F.3d 647 (9th Cir. 2014), a venal claimant met a not-very competent plan administrator, and the result was a helpful discussion of limits on make-whole equitable claims. [Note, on December 16, 2014, the Ninth Circuit panel withdrew this opinion, and replaced it with a new one, at … Continue Reading

Supreme Court Emphasizes that ERISA Plans Are Not Always Pre-Eminent

In a recent decision involving fiduciary duties in Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs), the Supreme Court emphasized an important limit on the pre-eminence of the plan document. Recent Supreme Court decisions, primarily in the welfare benefit plan context, have emphasized the primary importance of the plan document in establishing a fiduciary’s obligations and a participant’s … Continue Reading

New York Times article: Breach of fiduciary duty to fail to monitor and reduce fees

It’s not often that an ERISA issue gets prominent play in the press, but a recent article by Gretchen Morgenson is an exception. A Lone Ranger of the 401(k)’s  began: The arithmetic could not be simpler. The more fees you pay in your 401(k) plan, the less cash you’ll have for retirement. Still, fees hidden … Continue Reading

Disgorgement of $3,800,000 ordered for failure to pay $900,000 in disability benefits

The Sixth Circuit has just taken an “unprecedented and extraordinary step to expand the scope of ERISA coverage” (in the words of the dissent) by affirming a judgment directing a disability insurer to pay about $900,000 in improperly denied benefits plus disgorge an additional $3,800,000, representing profits it allegedly made on the benefits. I agree … Continue Reading

Presumption that Plan Administrator Acted Prudently Does Not Apply in Stock-Drop Case

ERISA requires fiduciaries to follow a prudent person standard regarding investment decisions. For plans requiring investment in the employer’s stock, often called Employee Stock Ownership Plans, or ESOPs, courts have developed a presumption that the investment in employer stock is prudent. A recent 9th Circuit case has addressed the limits of that presumption. Harris v. … Continue Reading

Upcoming Webinar: “ERISA Equitable Remedies After McCutchen and Amara”

I will be speaking in an upcoming live phone/web seminar, “ERISA Equitable Remedies After McCutchen and Amara” scheduled for Wednesday, July 10, 1:00pm-2:30pm EDT. Because you are a reader of this blog, you are eligible to attend this program at half off. As long as you use the links in this post, the offer will … Continue Reading

“Injured While Intoxicated” Means What It Says

Life insurance plans, accidental death and dismemberment plans, and disability plans often exclude coverage for losses that occur while the participant is intoxicated, or where the loss is intentionally self-inflicted. Though these exclusions are often very clear, they are often the subject of contentious disputes over what, exactly, they mean, or were intended to mean, … Continue Reading

Revenue Sharing in 401(k) Plans is OK, According to the Seventh Circuit

Revenue sharing is an arrangement under which a mutual fund in which pension assets are invested pays a portion of its fees to the entity that services the pension plan. In Leimkuehler v. American United Life Ins. Co., 713 F.3d 905 (7th Cir. 2013), the Seventh Circuit held that the arrangement did not violate ERISA … Continue Reading

Fiduciary Duties and Investment Bubbles

It is well-established that and ERISA pension plan administrator has a fiduciary duty to invest plan assets prudently. This duty is called, unimaginatively, the “prudent-man rule” – or perhaps the gender-neutral “prudent-person rule.” This rule, which existed long before ERISA was enacted, is enshrined in the text of the statute, which requires fiduciaries to use … Continue Reading
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