Patrick Begos

Patrick Begos

Mr. Begos has nearly 30 years of commercial and insurance litigation, arbitration, mediation and negotiation experience, representing companies and individuals in a wide array of industries. He has a national reputation in handling litigation under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) and, in particular, denial of group benefits claims. Mr. Begos has litigated hundreds of ERISA cases and has been involved in shaping the development of ERISA law across the country. He is a regular speaker at ERISA and insurance conferences around the country and has written extensively for various nationwide publications. Read his full rc.com bio here.

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Department of Labor Proposes to Delay Implementation of Disability Claim Regulations

On October 6, 2017, the Department of Labor signed a proposed Rule “to delay for ninety (90) days – through April 1, 2018 – the applicability of the Final Rule amending the claims procedure requirements applicable to ERISA-covered employee benefit plans that provide disability benefits.” Specifically, the DOL proposes: Section 2560.503-1 is amended by removing … Continue Reading

It May Be Time to Start Thinking About Equitable Claims Again

A recent decision by the Eighth  Circuit Court of Appeals, Jones v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., No. 16-1714, 2017 U.S. App. LEXIS 8112 (8th Cir. May 8, 2017), provides another signal that those of us defending against benefit claims increasingly may have to contend with simultaneous equitable claims for breach of fiduciary duty. Though the law … Continue Reading

Insurer Did Not Breach Fiduciary Duty by Disclosing Substance Abuse Claim to Employer

In Williams v. FedEx Corporate Servs., 849 F.3d 889 (10th Cir. 2017), plaintiff sued FedEx for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by requiring him to enroll in the company’s substance abuse and drug testing program. He also sued Aetna, FedEx’s STD insurer, for breach of fiduciary duty for reporting to FedEx that plaintiff … Continue Reading

Disability Plan Administrator Can Reasonably Change its Mind About Sufficiency of Evidence

In Geiger v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., 845 F.3d 357 (7th Cir. 2017), Aetna initially determined that plaintiff qualified for disability benefits due to bilateral avascular necrosis in her ankles, which prevented walking and driving. When the definition of disability was about to change, Aetna conducted an Independent Medical Exam, which found her capable of … Continue Reading

ERISA Preempts Negligence Claim Against Disability Peer Reviewer

In Milby v. MCMC LLC, 844 F.3d 605 (6th Cir. 2016), the plaintiff had her claim for disability benefits terminated following a peer review by a doctor engaged through MCMC. The plaintiff lived in Kentucky, and the peer reviewer was not licensed there. Accordingly, the plaintiff sued MCMC for negligence per se for practicing medicine … Continue Reading

Employer lacks standing to sue multi-employer plan for violation of ERISA and PPACA

In Soehnlen v. Fleet Owners Ins. Fund, 844 F.3d 576 (6th Cir. 2016), an employer, its CEO, and an hourly employee (for themselves and as representatives of a putative class of similarly situated employees) sued the defendant for violating ERISA and PPACA (Obamacare) by maintaining per-participant and per-beneficiary caps on benefits. Plaintiff employer bought supplemental … Continue Reading

ERISA preempts common-law fraud claims against employer for enrollment dispute

In Prince v. Sears Holdings Corp., 848 F.3d 173 (4th Cir. 2017), plaintiff applied for life insurance for his spouse through Sears, his employer, in 2010. Sears sent an acknowledgment to plaintiff, and Sears’ online benefits summary confirmed in 2012 that his wife had life insurance. Plaintiff’s wife died in 2014, and the insurer denied … Continue Reading

First Circuit rules that ERISA preemption of claim is an arbitrable issue

In Prime Healthcare Servs. – Landmark LLC v. United Nurses & Allied Prof’ls, Local 5067, 848 F.3d 41 (1st Cir. 2017), the First Circuit ruled that an arbitration agreement required the arbitrator to determine whether ERISA preempted the claims at issue. Plaintiff purchased a financially troubled hospital that had a pension plan, and a collective … Continue Reading

New Look. Same Blog.

As a result of my joining the Robinson+Cole Employee Benefits and Compensation Group in January 2017, the ERISA Claim Defense Blog has been added to the firm’s Thought Leadership offering. In addition to new posts, the blog has all of the same content it did from when I started it in 2012. For those of you who … Continue Reading

Does Presidential Memorandum Affect Disability Claim Regulations?

The DOL’s recent amendments to the disability claim regulations, 29 C.F.R. §  2560.503-1, became effective January 18, 2017, but the new provisions in that new regulation do not take effect until January 1, 2018 (for claims filed after that date). The January 18, 2017 effective date was apparently intentional, as it was just before inauguration … Continue Reading

DOL Issues New Regulations for Plans Providing Disability Benefits

On December 19, 2016, the Department of Labor ended a year-long process to update the regulations governing claim procedures for disability plans, 29 C.F.R. §  2560.503-1. The text of the new regulations, and the DOL’s explanation of changes and the comment process, can be found here. The DOL’s express goal in establishing these new regulations … Continue Reading

“Bare violation” of ERISA without concrete injury does not confer standing

Lee v. Verizon Commc’ns, Inc., — F.3d –, 2016 WL 4926159 (5th Cir. Sept. 15, 2016), held that a defined benefit pension plan participant does not have Article III standing to challenge the plan’s alleged violation of ERISA, in the absence of “concrete injury” to himself. The case is a putative class action growing out … Continue Reading

Extra-ERISA contractual obligation regarding pension plan is enforceable

Hunter v. Berkshire Hathaway, Inc., 829 F.3d 357, 358 (5th Cir. 2016), involved the interpretation of parties’ rights and obligations regarding a pension plan following a corporate acquisition. Its discussion of the extent to which an employer can obligate itself not to change a plan, even when benefits are not vested, is noteworthy.… Continue Reading

Mutual fund redemptions payable to participants are not plan assets, and broker can retain interest earned while holding the cash

In re Fid. ERISA Float Litig., 829 F.3d 55 (1st Cir. 2016), held that Fidelity did not breach fiduciary duties to the plans at issue by allegedly earning interest on cash on its way to participants after a redemption had been made. The case involved a number of 401(k) plans that had hired Fidelity as … Continue Reading

Internal quality assurance discussion about $100,000 error in plan interpretation not evidence of conflict

Running an employee benefit claims operation is a complex undertaking, which requires continual training and oversight. A robust quality assurance organization can play an important part in the overall management mix. Curran v. Aetna Life Ins. Co., 13-cv-289, 2016 WL 3843085 (S.D.N.Y. July 11, 2016), gives a concrete example of a quality assurance review catching … Continue Reading

Second Circuit rejects “substantial compliance” rule

In Halo v. Yale Health Plan, 819 F.3d 42 (2d Cir. 2016), the Second Circuit made a significant change to the impact of ERISA claim regulations on subsequent litigation, rejecting the rule that it is sufficient for claim administrators to substantially comply with the regulations. Instead, the court held that, unless there is strict compliance … Continue Reading

Language in SPD can be used to find discretion where SPD is incorporated into plan

In Burrell v. Prudential Ins. Co. of America, — F.3d –, 2016 WL 1426092 (5th Cir. Apr. 11, 2016), plaintiff argued that the plan did not give discretionary authority to Prudential, because the plan merely defined “Claim Fiduciary” as the person or entity “designated in the Plan (including the Summary Plan Description, Insurance Contracts or … Continue Reading

Court shifts burden of proof to plan

Estate of Barton v. ADT Security Svcs. Pension Plan, — F.3d. –, 2016 WL 1612755 (9th Cir. Apr. 21, 2016), involved a plaintiff who worked for about 20 years (with a couple of interruptions) for ADT and affiliated entities. His employers went through several mergers and acquisitions during the period, and some (but perhaps not … Continue Reading

On Tibble remand, court finds plaintiffs forfeited continuing-duty-to-monitor argument

Tibble v. Edison Int’l, — F.3d –, 2016 WL 1445220 (9th Cir. Apr. 13, 2016) (“Tibble II”), marks the Ninth Circuit’s second review of the case after its earlier decision was vacated by the Supreme Court. Tibble v. Edison Int’l, 135 S.Ct. 1823 (2015) (“Tibble I”). Tibble I concerns the commencement of the statute of … Continue Reading

Another SCOTUS subrogation decision, and another deep dive into equity treatises

There is a lot about ERISA litigation that is hard to understand, but perhaps the most opaque issue is subrogation, which is the law governing when and how plans can recover benefits from participants. It seems that the Supreme Court is constantly changing the rules (while denying that it’s changing the rules), based on its … Continue Reading
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